Business

I Am Not A Hunter

What are you great at?  I know if you asked me that question, I would say building relationships and sharing in peoples stories.  I love getting to know people for who they are and seeing how we can best partner up and help each other.  Not everyone is wired this way and that is what this article is all about, sorry outdoor enthusiasts or folks who love posts about gun regulations.
We need to fully understand what we are great at, which is part of our personal brand, if we truly want to  make the most sales and have the biggest impact.  If you find yourself as the proverbial “hunter” in sales, then by all means, go out and do your quick kills and bring that back to the “family” so we can eat.  If you are a farmer,  then understand you still have great value for the “family.”  You are playing the long game as you cultivate relationships.  You are the ones that have the opportunity to yield more than what you have “planted.” 
Please do us all a favor and be uniquely you.  Learn what you can from others and books, but apply that with your own personality, shake it up, and see what comes out.  If you want to have more sales, a giant impact, and know what opportunity to choose, first figure out what your great at and then do all you can to do more of that in your job.  Don’t try and be someone else.   Be you through and through and opportunities will start to come about.
Community

How To Be A Halfway Decent Mentee

There are a million and one things that we want to be in this world, but I know what one of them isn’t… an awful mentee.

It has come to my attention that myself and so many others have some room for improvement in this area of being a mentee.  One of the tips I am going to give was sparked from a post by Jon Acuff. I follow him in relation to getting ideas in relationship to entrepreneurship and it has been #money.  (Click here to do the same)  The other ideas is something I have learned from others over the years and have since been practicing it personally.

  1. Stop wasting mentors time – This idea is brilliant and Jon spelt it out nicely.  The biggest way that we waste the time of others is by asking crappy questions.  When we get an opportunity to meet with someone we usually come ill prepared and make them do all the work.  We want them to come up with something brilliant, yet we come to the meeting with bad questions.  Worse yet, we some times come so unprepared we have no idea of what the conversations will really be about.
  2. Have a list of questions – The best thing you can do is to have a list of 10+ questions that are always ready in the proverbial back pocket. These questions need to be a mixture of general and very focused.  The focused questions can be around a topic that the mentor has experience in and that is crucial for your next steps.  Either way, be prepared at all times by having this list of questions in your memory banks.

These two tips go hand in hand and will change the way you interact with those you want to learn from.  The best part is going to be that they are going to see you have taken the effort and feel that you actually value them, their time, and their opinion.  

One last tip… I know, so generous.  One last tip, put into action the things that you hear.  If you don’t, and if there is no change, you can forget having a second and third meeting with this person because they will have seen that you really don’t care about them and what they had to say.

Please, lets all take a collective step in the right direction and be a better mentee.

Culture

The Year of ASK Part 3

I’m not sure about you, but if I had to choose between a toxic or healthy culture, I choose healthy everyday.  The real question is, if you find yourself in a place that breeds distrust, anxiety, and broken teams, how can you counteract that and fight against that toxic culture?  Today we are going to look at the third thing we need to do to start shaping and shifting the culture of where we find ourself.  If you missed the first post… just click here, and if you missed the second post… click here.

We are finally at the K in the year of ASK.  The K is by far the hardest yet most rewarding step in this whole process.  The K stands for Keep moving forward.  Keep pressing into those relationships we have been building by asking questions and commenting on what we are seeing.  When we ask those questions and focus on the relationship over the opportunity, it starts to shift and shape the culture.  When we comment on things we are seeing others do, those actions, if positive, get repeated or, if negative, stop happening.  

The K is difficult because we want to see instant results, but real culture shifting ideas and actions don’t always happen overnight.  Culture shifting ideas and actions take time.  We need to constantly be pressing into those relationships we are building because we don’t know what is going on in the other persons life.  We don’t know what story they are living and what is happening behind the curtain.

No matter a persons title, position, or circumstance, they have a story that needs to be heard, and the only way to do that is by living out the year or ASK.

Culutre

The Year of ASK Part 2

I’m not sure about you, but if I had to choose between a toxic or healthy culture, I choose healthy everyday.  The real question is, if you find yourself in a place that breeds distrust, anxiety, and broken teams, how can you counteract that and fight against that toxic culture?  Today we are going to look at the second of three things that we need to do to start shaping and shifting the culture of where we find ourself.  If you missed the first post… just click here.

The second thing we can do in the year of ASK that will help to shape and shift the culture of where we are is that if you See Something, Say Something. It’s as simple as that. If you see something, say something.  The reason why this is so important is because what is seen is measured and what is measured is repeated.

If you want something to be repeated, or stopped, make sure you comment on it.  As people, we are conditioned to respond to positive and negative feedback.  We all long to be part of a community and it is this longing that makes us respond to the feedback that we get.  If we are complimented or encouraged with an action we have done, we repeat it because we want that same encouraging feedback.  If we are doing something wrong and called out on it, that feeling of angst or discomfort keeps us from doing that same action again.

This action of Seeing and Saying not only affects the one it is directed at, but also the others that are a part of the group.  People aren’t idiots and they pick up on what is expected, praised, and belittled.  They see what is working and they themselves start to repeat those actions because they long for the same feedback.

Whether you’re a leader or not, start implementing this simple idea and watch how the culture begins to change. 

Culture

The Year Of Ask Part 1

I’m not sure about you, but if I had to choose between a toxic or healthy culture, I choose healthy everyday.  The real question is, if you find yourself in a place that breeds distrust, anxiety, and broken teams, how can you counteract that and fight against that toxic culture?  Today we are going to look at the first of three things that we need to do to start shaping and shifting the culture of where we find ourself.

The first thing we need to do to start shaping and shifting the culture is ask questions.  I know this doesn’t seem life altering, but I promise you, the impact of this is a game changer.  When we are intentional about asking those around us pointed questions about life or work, it puts a focus on the relationship.  When people start to understand that you are actually interested in them and in a relationship, a positive shift in the culture starts to take place. 

When asking others questions, you need to implement something that Chick-fil-A, a popular quick service restaurant, does with all of their customer interactions.  When interacting with customers, they use the Core Four.  The Core four are: Eye Contact, Smiling, Speaking Enthusiastically, and Staying Connected.  When you implement the Core Four when asking questions, it actively shows the other person that they are valued.

When those that we work with feel valued, it starts a slow but noticeable shift towards trust.  That trust breeds teamwork, and that teamwork leads to increased productivity and so much more.  I know this little tip seems stupidly simple, but when you focus on the relationship and are intentional with asking your coworkers questions about life or work, the culture starts to shift.